Tag: SEM

Online TV: Good press 4 @DownstreamTweet

Online TV: Good press 4 @DownstreamTweet

Amplify’d from www.smh.com.au
Online TV ads to be traded in auction-style exchanges

ADVERTISERS will be able to bid for television-style ads online across multiple websites by the end of the year, though it could be up to three years before the market represents a large chunk of the $2.2 billion online ad market.

Downstream Marketing and the media-buying consortium Group M say the technology for trading ads placed before, during or after online videos will be in place by December.

Already a small but growing volume of online display ads are bought and sold through exchanges or demand side-platforms run by media-buying groups, or by larger networks such as Google.

Television commercials viewed online is the next sector to become biddable – that is, when ads can be sold in automated, split-second, auction-style trades.

Media executives might be fearful, the media investor Daniel Petre says, but they will have to get used to it.

”As soon as the technology is there advertising will be wrapped in it,” Downstream’s chief executive, Steve Knowles, says.

”More and more people are demanding content online so whether it’s Apple TV, Google, Netflix, the television networks or Facebook that provides it doesn’t really matter. There will be advertising and it will be biddable.”

Rather than sell such ads on a traditional cost per thousand (CPM) model, agencies such as Downstream say they can draw on data such as the websites people visit, the forms they fill in and possibly even their purchasing history online to target specific audience niches with clients’ TVCs. Media agencies can specify a target audience and the maximum price they are prepared to pay for those eyeballs.

“It’s bringing rational pricing to [online] TV,” said Downstream’s chief operating officer, Justin Hind.

Although watching TV shows or films online makes up less than 5 per cent of total viewing, it is predicted to grow rapidly as more TVs are connected to a high-speed internet.

Online video advertising is currently a $33 million market – a relative minnow – but which Frost & Sullivan predict will be worth $180 million by 2015.

Danny Bass, the chief digital officer for the media buying consortium Group M, will sell video ads this way through its demand side platform by the year’s end. But he could not predict what volumes might be traded. “The more inventory that becomes available the more likely it is fall to an exchange.”

Downstream backer Mr Petre, the chairman of Netus, an investment company backed by News Ltd, said an auction-style trading platform did not necessarily mean rates would fall.

“There is a fear that everything that goes through an exchange will go to 50¢ a CPM but if you are delivering valuable content then that won’t be the case,” said Mr Petre, who also sits on the board of Nine Entertainment Co, which has a half-share in Ninemsn.

“People will resist it because they are fearful but in the end advertisers will love it because at last they will pay for advertising that performs well. At last the most appropriate ad is shown to the most appropriate audience.”

Read more at www.smh.com.au

 

Good to see one of my clients (GetPrice) getting a good wrap for our SEM campaign

Good to see one of my clients (GetPrice) getting a good wrap for our SEM campaign

The traditional retailers didn’t come off to well, but sites such as GetPrice with millions of long-tail keywords and targeted ad copies across multiple search engines are getting a great wrap for consumer experience and visibility.

Amplify’d from digitalministry.com

Google AdWords – Aussie Retailers Behind the Eight Ball

Written by Sean Wyld | January 31st 2011 What is your opinion?

With the hundreds of millions of dollars spent each year on advertising by the major electrical retailers, why do the likes of Harvey Norman, JB Hi Fi, Dick Smith, Myer and Co seem more interested in complaining about GST then utilising Google AdWords effectively? And why aren’t the leading online retailers like Deals Direct and OO.com.au maximising the opportunity?

Walk into your local JB Hi Fi, Harvey Norman or Dick Smith and tell them you’re interested in buying a Samsung UA55C9000.  The sales person will take you to the TV section show you a shiny new Samsung UA55C9000 55” LED TV, tell you the price and tell you how much better your life will be with it sitting in your living room.

Now try the same thing online.  Go to Google.com.au and search for Samsung UA55C9000:

Out of all of the retailers in Australia, how many are interested in selling you a Samsung UA55C9000 TV, e.g. how many have an Google AdWords ad? Only one, the Electrical Discounter.  An honourable mention to price comparison sites, Get Price and Price Dumper and a thanks for playing to Optus with an ad for the right brand but wrong product.  With the hundreds of millions of advertising dollars spent each year by the major electrical retailers, where are the likes of Harvey Norman, JB Hi Fi, Dick Smith and Myer?  Or for that matter, where are the leading Australian online retailers like Deals Direct, OO.com.au and Dstore?

Read more at digitalministry.com

Facebook ad formats getting more social

Facebook ad formats getting more social

(via www.clickz.com)

Facebook has launched “Sponsored Stories” ads, which let marketers utilize messages from their “likes” community for paid promotions on the site. The ads contain word-for-word Facebook user posts, while appearing in the right-hand column with other paid promotions on the website.

A bevy of launch partners have already readied campaigns involving the new ads. They include Coca Cola, Levi’s, and Anheuser Busch, as well as nonprofits like Amnesty International, UNICEF, Autism Speaks, and Women for Women.

Jim Squires, marketing products manager for the Palo Alto, CA-based social giant, told ClickZ that Sponsored Stories will be available on the site’s self-service platform in a comparable manner to other ads. They will be purchased on an impression- or per-click basis, he said.

For a brand like Starbucks, an endorsement that looks like this:

starbucks-sponsored1

May appear in an ad unit like this:

starbucks-sponsored

“Essentially, the recommended approach is to use [them] in conjunction with a campaign you are already running,” Squires said. “So, you say, ‘I want to add Sponsored Stories to this.’ In that case, when a Sponsored Story is able to show, it is showing [instead of] the controlled advertiser message.”

Read more at www.clickz.com

Finally updated my résumé to include my current job @ Downstream.

Finally updated my résumé to include my current job @ Downstream.

Included my current work:

Currently I am working at Downstream Marketing, a digital performance marketing agency in Sydney’s CBD. My primary role as an Account Executive involves setting up and managing pay-per-click (PPC) search engine marketing (SEM), performance display and social media campaigns and consulting on web design for conversion driven landing pages. As part of this process I regularly host client meetings and performance reviews as well as setting up an array of reporting, analysis and optimisation systems and processes. Clients during my time at Downstream include: American Express, GetPrice, JumpOnIt, National Australia Bank (Share Trading), Budget, AAMI, JustCar, InsureMyRide, Shannons, eHarmony, Freelancer.com, iiNet, Insuranceline, Informa, Live In Australia, Jetabroad and Bingle.

Downstream is still looking to hire, #SEM Assistants/Managers – GREAT place to work, good benefits

Downstream is still looking to hire, #SEM Assistants/Managers – GREAT place to work, good benefits

Downstream Marketing is Australia’s largest and faster growing strategic Search Marketing agency. Awarded B&T’s Emerging Agency of the Year for 2008, we were recognized as the best of the best amongst all marketing services agencies and disciplines. Because of our ongoing success, we are looking for high caliber candidates to join our team.

If you have a passion for digital, data and direct marketing, Downstream could be an agency where you can grow your career in the fast paced, ever changing world of Search and performance digital marketing. Downstream is a values based organization that recognizes team members based on their output, not input. We believe in operating under the principals of “freedom within boundaries” and actively encourage all staff members to excel in both their careers and non-work life.

If you are passionate about crafting the career you want, being a member of a collaborative team and pushing your own personal boundaries, Downstream may be the right fit for you. Detailed below are career opportunities currently on offer.

Lessons from Sci-Fi

Lessons from Sci-Fi

So, I went to see the new Star Trek movie recently on it’s opening day. My girlfriend, Joni, is a former-semi-closet-now-unashamed Star Trek fan and I had hardly seen much Star Trek before (not a single episode until the Christmas just gone by).

The movie was great, as I’m sure you have heard (or know from experience), but it got me onto watching a bunch of old Star Trek and it’s reminding me of a lot of the Sci-Fi that I’ve watched over the years. They all have some interesting stuff in common and, in my opinion, you can learn more from Sci-Fi than from any other genre.

On this premise, I’m kicking off a series of posts “Lessons from Sci-Fi.”

The topics will include things like the science, political, social and religious commentary, technology, artificial intelligence, environment, living on other planets, war, peace, occupation/colonisation/insurgence, patience (hehe), storytelling, dreaming, hero complex, not taking yourself too seriously…and much more!

Comments encouraged!

Set up to fail? Democracy or plutocracy?

Set up to fail? Democracy or plutocracy?

Recent anomalies in British Columbian and Canadian election results have re-ignited electoral reform as a prominent topic of debate. The British Columbian Citizens’ Assembly on Electoral Reform in 2004 was the first successful implementation of deliberative democracy with directly legislated decision-making powers.

The assembly’s recommended voting system, the British Columbian Single-Transferable-Vote (or BC-STV), was supported by 95% of its members. However, the final recommendation was subject to a provincial referendum which only garnered 57.7% of support province-wide, falling 2.3% short of the 60% supermajority required to pass – demonstrating a vast disparity compared to its support within the Citizens’ Assembly.

Recently, I have been flooded with articles and opinions saying that BC rejected STV in the last referendum. However, I cannot possibly fathom how this argument can be legitimately made. It looks to me that BC accepted STV with a landslide in political terms. Just four years earlier, in 2001, the liberals had a “landslide victory” with 77 out of 79 seats from 57.6% of the popular vote – less than STV had when it “failed” to gain acceptance.

People from the NO-STV campaign have been kicking and screaming about the possibility of a minority getting input in making decisions. Do they not realise that they were the minority in 2005 that stopped the majority (57.7%) getting the change that they voted for?

The assembly process was designed by Hon. Gordon Gibson, a former politician and recipient of the Order of British Columbia. Following Gibson’s recommendations, the Legislative Assembly of British Columbia (with 77 of the 79 seats held by BC Liberals) had the final say on enacting it. The legislature included additional rules such as a 60% supermajority of the popular vote through a referendum process. The only public communication planned for the final design was a leaflet that was mailed to every house in the province five-months before the referendum.

Leading up to the 2005 referendum there was almost no campaign whatsoever and there was a strong anti-STV sentiment within the media pundits. Considering the inherent restraints and direct opposition, the Citizens’ Assembly and the electorate of British Columbia can be applauded for the success of 57.7% provincial support.

So I have a few questions.

What does the discrepancy between the Citizens’ Assembly support compared to that of the public referendum support say about the process? The assembly members were chosen from the general public. Why did the recommendation not ultimately pass at voting time? Were these eleven months and 5.5 million dollars of taxpayers’ money well spent? Was this a very expensive stunt or will it finally lead to much needed change in BC?

It’s now come to crunch time and the citizens’ of BC can either be lead into fear by those who’s interests are protected by the current FPTP system, or they can take steps of faith and lead the way for the world in adopting a system that was designed for the people, by the people, with the support of the people.

For more information read my thesis – Closing the Gap in Deliberative Democracy:? The Importance of Communication in the?Post-Deliberative Process

More updates

More updates

Okay, here’s more that I didn’t update on last night.

  • Well, I stopped rugby pretty soon after starting because I realised that it is not worth the high chance of becoming a paraplegic ;( – rowing over here is basically screwed. I’m not sure I’m that enthusiastic after I was kinda stuffed around by them. I still love the sport but I think it may not be the right time and place for me to be on the water at the moment. (also being really flat out with uni, letting that take the reins for a bit)
  • We’re thinking MONTREAL NEXT SUMMER!! Then possibly Australia, or heading to somewhere to work teaching ESL and getting paid well 🙂 (pay of student loans) — the options are endless!!
  • Things are going to be really hectic, and next semester I’m going to start needing more money 🙁 — honours is costing $4500 (all I’m doing is writing a thesis and having 1 meeting a month!??!?!?!!), res is $2500 and compulsory meal plan $1350 (minimum) so I’m going to have to find work.

P.S. I’ve started moving personal posts to private because this site is increasingly being used as my resume (essentially).

Growing up and growing stones

Growing up and growing stones

Sorry its been ages since my last post, things have been full on over here 🙂

Currently I’m doing 17cp at SFU including my honours project!

I’m graduating this spring and after that I have no idea what I’m doing. I grew the stones to bring it up with Joni last night and we had a really good chat, about everything really. Man, I’m lucky with that girl 🙂 – soon it’ll be a year that we’ve been together, wow!

We talked about the fact that we’re both graduating and making plans for the future and the reality of the moment is, however scary one may find it, we’re both making plan’s with each other in mind. It kind of hit me that I am really an adult now. Scary, but more exciting than anything when I think about it.

I’m still working on my lack of skills with confrontation for things that are important to me, last night was an improvement. Still got more work in that area, but I’l get there 😀

In other news, somehow I’m the first International student to be accepted into an Honours program here at SFU, so I’m treading new ground and again proving that if its not working, just push harder 😉

Things are going to be really hectic, and next semester I’m going to start needing more money 🙁

But… I’ve really got it good, and life is exciting… WOW!

Peace out 😉

Finished!

Finished!

Well, I know you’re probably feeling neglected my poor blog… good thing you don’t have feelings!

So, where have I been? I’ve been finishing off Uni for the semester!!! IT’S ALL DONE!

Trained out at the riff (Penrith) yesterday – ’twas windy and cold ;( – but the pieces were getting faster throughout the day, quite proportionately to the rate, which is encouraging.

Anyway, I’m about to take Jesse to the movies as any good brother should – it’s his Birthday present from me 😀

I’m sure going to miss my family, also some close friends and the rowing season – but apart from that… WHOOOO!!! I CAN’T WAIT TO GET TO CANADA!!

Peace out 😉