Tag: campaign

Digital Marketing Explained: Website or Landing Page

Digital Marketing Explained: Website or Landing Page

This is a part of the Digital Marketing Explained Holy Grail Post Series, the outline will be kept together on the Digital Marketing page.
ditial marketing holy grail
Organic digital marketing refers to the optimisation of traffic that you would receive organically (without having to promote) from direct website visits, links from search engines, links from other websites or email referrals. Social media profiles will also receive organic traffic but that will be discussed in the social media section.

Website or Landing Page

Your website or landing page is the first port of call for most people. Even if you are not promoting it directly, people will still try to find it when exposed to other campaign material.

The best part is that you have complete control over your website, albeit within the capabilities of your web development/IT team, content management system and internal policies.

Unlike any other channel, your website or landing page else allows you to craft your message, direct people to your conversion funnel and track the results.

What’s the difference between a website and a landing page?

Website: A website is generally open to the public, the first point of call for people to navigate across your brand.

Landing page: A landing page is specifically built for a campaign and preferably has minimum distractions.

“Your website should be designed to impress your target market and Google”[1]

When building a website or landing page you should have two goals in mind. Firstly, most obviously and importantly, you should be aiming to impress your audience. Secondly, however, you are building to impress Google (among other search engines) by building it in such a way that will be “index-friendly”

Planning a website or landing page (referred to as page from here on) is just like when you are planning any other campaign; first you must define your goals then you can design your page.

Digital Marketing Explained: Digital Marketing Landscape

Digital Marketing Explained: Digital Marketing Landscape

This is a part of the Digital Marketing Explained Holy Grail Post Series, the outline will be kept together on the Digital Marketing page.
ditial marketing holy grail

Landscape

Here is a list of the digital marketing landscape at a glance. It can be hard to categorise the different channels as there is a lot of crossover between them.

Therefore the organisation of this list is not necessarily ontologically correct, however, it is organised from the marketing perspective and which channels should be thought of together.

Furthermore, they are not all “channels” per say. Some of the list includes cross-channel topics that a good marketer should consider in their digital strategy (for example moderation, feedback and viral marketing). 

  • Organic
    • Website or Landing Page
    • Organic Search
    • Email
  • Paid
    • Paid Search
    • Display Advertising
    • Social Media Advertising
    • Mobile Ads
  • Social
    • Facebook
    • Twitter
    • YouTube
    • Google Plus
    • StumbleUpon
    • Blogging
    • MeetUp
    • Social Bookmarking
  • Applications
    • Web
    • Facebook
    • Mobile
  • Analytics
  • Other
    • Wikipedia
    • Forums
    • Wikis
    • Moderation
    • Feedback
    • Viral Marketing
    • Podcasting
    • SMS
    • QR Codes

 The rest of this series will outline best practices, user guides, case studies and marketing strategies for the channels/topics in the order listed above. Feel free to jump around to the topics that interest you the most. However, I strongly recommend that the website/landing page section be read before moving on to any other topics.

Digital Marketing Explained: How to do Digital Marketing?

Digital Marketing Explained: How to do Digital Marketing?

This is the third part of the Digital Marketing Explained Holy Grail Post Series, the outline will be kept together on the Digital Marketing page.
ditial marketing holy grail

 Explained

The what, why, how and when part of this series is the most important part; simply grasping the concepts laid out will put you a long way ahead in the path to effective digial marketing.

What is Digital Marketing?

Why do Digital Marketing?

How to do Digital Marketing?

Tailor your message and find your audience.

LESSON #3: CAVES = CREDIBLE, ACCESSIBLE, VISIBLE, ENGAGING AND SHARABLE.

Digital marketing is done crafting your message(s) and then finding your audience and sharing that message using a variety of digital platforms.

Each platform has its specialties, your first priority is to define your goals first and then decide on your marketing plan. These goals must be tangible, measurable and consistent. In most cases hits, visits and clicks just will not cut it. Try for goals that show some level of engagement, for example: sales, email signups or competition entries.

Once you’ve decided upon your goals then decide on then ensure that you can track those goals against your efforts and that they allow for optimisations (e.g. changing the creative message). Optimisations will improve performance over time and help inform future marketing activities.

To get the most out of your efforts and have continued brand awareness a useful acronym is CAVES.

Examples
Credible Have unsubscribe links on emails, do not send unsolicited emails, include privacy policies etc.
Accessible Subscribe forms, links to about page, no distractions, simple interface.
Visible Be where your audience is (campaign targeting); be found when looked for (search engines).
Engaging Create content that people want to engage with.
Sharable Create content that people want to share, and make it easy for them to do so.

The rest of this document will outline the specifics of “how to do digital marketing,” and provide case studies and user guides, however, these principals should be at the front of your mind as you are guided through this process.

Digital Marketing Explained: Why do Digital Marketing?

Digital Marketing Explained: Why do Digital Marketing?

This is the second part of the Digital Marketing Explained Holy Grail Post Series, the outline will be kept together on the Digital Marketing page.
ditial marketing holy grail

 Explained

The what, why, how and when part of this series is the most important part; simply grasping the concepts laid out will put you a long way ahead in the path to effective digial marketing.

What is Digital Marketing?

Why do Digital Marketing?

There is an audience out there that wants to interact. Help them!

LESSON #2: MARKETING = VISABILITY & RELATIONSHIP MANAGEMENT.

There is an audience out there that wants to interact. Help them! Make it easy for them find you and once you have them, treat them well then they will stick around, maybe even become an evangelist.

People are quickly migrating huge portions of their activities and time from analogue to digital channels. At the same time digital is infinitely more trackable, targetable and unobtrusive.

Marketing is shifting away from the “push” and “spray” paradigms toward “pull” and “target” ones. Instead of pushing your campaign, people search for you or your competitors. Instead of buying large quantities of generic media (e.g. newspaper ads) that is irrelevant and annoying, people can be targeted with message that is more relevant.

There are a lot of arguments to be made around digital analytics, targeting, interactivity, innovation et cetera, but at the end of the day the most important take away is this: if you are not there you will lose a huge potential audience, and if someone beats you to the chase then you could lose your current audience.

What's Newsified Today December 20, 2011

What's Newsified Today December 20, 2011

Here’s the top recent articles from my favourite blogs and news sites:

Google to increase AdWords account limits to 500 campaigns…

Google to increase AdWords account limits to 500 campaigns…

As many adwords professionals know, there is a soft limit in Google AdWords of about 40,000 keywords (it changes every now and then) and then there is a hard limit of 100 campaigns, 5,000 adgroups per campaign and a total of 1 million keywords (including negatives).

The hard limit is often available to agencies upon request to your account manager from Google.

Today I got an email saying that over the next few weeks Adwords will be updated in to reflect this new system of account limits:

  • 500 campaigns (active and paused)
  • 20,000 ad groups (per campaign)
  • 3 million KWs/placements/topics/audiences (active and paused per account).

Unfortunately Yahoo/Bing still has much smaller limits, and most advertisers have already set up separate Google accounts to account for hundreds of campaigns, but still it provides hope for the future.

Can Brands Maintain Engagement on Facebook?

Can Brands Maintain Engagement on Facebook?

Amplify’d from www.emarketer.com
Can Brands Maintain Engagement on Facebook?

“Likes” can go down as fan bases increase

FBLI

Growing a base of Facebook fans is often a major objective for social media marketers. Whether through special offers available only to fans, the promise of exclusive content or simply through a compelling campaign that reaches already-loyal customers, marketers are building up their presence on Facebook pages and hoping consumers flock there as well.

But as fan bases grow, the danger increases that the larger community will be less close-knit and engaged than before. Link-sharing solutions provider Visibli analyzed Facebook pages with at least 100,000 “likes” and found that for brands and media organizations, pages with more fans received fewer “likes” on each individual post. Engagement went down as the number of people involved went up.

And overall, brands are behind both artists and media organizations when it comes to average number of “likes” and comments per post.


There are many posting strategies brands can pursue to boost engagement on pages as the number of fans increases, however. Research from Buddy Media found that tweaking the length, timing and wording of posts could raise engagement.

In addition, the research from Visibli points to how brands should space out their posts. Half of all “likes” happen within 1 hour and 20 minutes of posting, and 70% happen within 4 hours. “Likes” taper off over time, until about 95% are received within 22 hours.


Furthermore, once a new post is up there’s less chance of “likes” on an older one, so brands should give messages time to play out and maximize engagement before updating.

Read more at www.emarketer.com

 

Run an effective $5 Facebook campaign

Run an effective $5 Facebook campaign

Amplify’d from www.socialmedia.biz

How to run an effective Facebook campaign for $5

jess3 ad

How to take advantage of the power of microtargeting on Facebook — at a crazy cheap price

dennis-yuLast week there was a buzz in the CEO, Webtrends and CEO, BlitzLocal offices. One of our employees was trying to get my attention. He did so by creating a Facebook ad targeting anyone who lived in Portland, was between 30 and 40 years old and worked at either Webtrends or BlitzLocal. Of the nearly 600 million users on Facebook, only 80 people met that criteria.

It cost him only 6 cents to do it. And for that price, he was able to bombard our people with ads. The cost of that inventory is a 30 cent CPM, which means it costs 30 cents to show a thousand ads. So he was able to send 200 highly targeted messages, as he details in this post on the Facebook Microtargeting trick.

Sounds less like advertising and more like super-targeted email marketing, doesn’t it?

And, in fact, it is, except for this:

• You can send these messages without needing someone’s email address.
• You pay only when someone clicks it (yes, it’s cost per click advertising).
• An impression is guaranteed when the person next opens Facebook (whereas in sending an email, you can only hope that someone will open it).

jess3 campaign

Click to enlarge

Now imagine that you’re a software company like Webtrends, building relationships with other agencies that resell your social analytics software. The founders of the data visualization agency JESS3 come to visit and you’d like to strengthen that bond. Maybe you spend $5 on a micro-targeted campaign like the one above, but slice it up to put the ad image more compactly next to the stats. You absolutely bombard anyone who works at that firm with your message almost 3,000 times. If they have 50 people, that’s 60 ads per person. Who cares that we got only 9 clicks (of which 4 happened to become fans)? The goal is not the click, but the awareness.

Total cost: $5.67 in Facebook ads

Create a specialty video with a customized message

But you could take it a step further, since those folks who do click through on the ad can come to your landing page. So imagine that we send all employees of the email marketing company ExactTarget to this Facebook landing page (warning: there is sound). And how much did this landing page cost? Only $5. We have a network of dozens of freelancers that will do voiceovers, take photos, sing songs or do whatever for a few dollars. More examples of specialty videos here.

Social media success is about pinpoint precision targets — we’re simulating the one-on-one conversations that friends have among themselves

While each of these examples might be clever or interesting, the question becomes: How do you scale this? Social media success is about pinpoint precision targets — ultimately, because we’re simulating the one-on-one conversations that friends have among themselves. But if you want to have 1,000 conversations, you need 1,000 different ads and 1,000 different landing pages. Who has the infrastructure, staff, or the budget to do that?

This is where smart automation comes in. Here’s an example of our scoring platform at work:

Webtrends sells analytics software to the big boys who don’t mind paying $100,000 per year for analytics software. Trouble is that every website needs some form of analytics. Maybe they’ll use Google Analytics — it’s free and pretty good. But we want to talk to only those customers who have the money and need for enterprise analytics software. It would be suicide to buy the keyword “web analytics” on PPC because of all the players that offer web analytics for free or super cheap.

So we took the Fortune 1000 and ran a script that collected a wide range of data — market cap, their industry, annual revenue, P/E ratio, website url, homepage pagerank, pages indexed, Facebook page, number of fans, company logo from Google images and so forth — dozens of metrics. See the detail from our spreadsheet/CSV file below.

Click to enlarge

And then we ran this data through our scoring algorithm to calculate their Social Score — how well they did versus peers in their industry. We might say, “Shell, you got a 56 and rank 7 out of 9 in Oil and Gas.” Or we might say, “Shell, why do you have only 53,548 fans while others in oil and gas have 184k on average?” Then we target people who work at Shell — not just everyone, but those people who have titles of VP of Marketing, Chief Financial Officer, Public Relations and so forth.

There might be only a couple dozen people and not everyone puts their information on Facebook, but it’s enough. And you can bet it gets their attention! They come to a landing page that has their social scoring report, which shows a portion of the metrics that we’ve gathered. But they have to click Like to see the rest of the report, which is grayed out.

Now what happens when that person clicks “Like”? Of course, some of their friends and co-workers see it. And as all curious co-workers will do, they want to check out what you found to be so interesting. And then when these people see our ad, it shows that their friend liked it, which makes our offer of a report that much more credible (image at right).

A move to quality targeting over mass media blasts

Now do you see how this works? It’s quality over quantity, folks. Think about who you want to target as precisely as possible. Where do they work? Where do they live? What kind of car do they drive? What TV shows do they watch? What industry conferences do they attend?

Let Facebook do the work for you, running ads that target journalists who write for the Wall Street Journal, Mashable, Forrester, VentureBeat, the New York Times

Can’t afford $15,000 to exhibit at your favorite conference, plus the $3k to ship the booth out, the cost of the people to have to man the booth during Expo Hall hours, the schwag you have to give out and so forth? Then run an ad for the three weeks leading up to the conference targeting fans of the conference.

Bingo, you’ve now spent $5 to target this audience with your message and you have plenty of time to set up in-person meetings with those folks who are worth talking to, as opposed to any random people who might wander up to visit you at the show. And then you can thank them later.

miva_thank_you

Click to enlarge

Need some PR help, but can’t afford a New York PR agency for $10,000 a month? Then let Facebook do the work for you, running ads that target journalists who write for the Wall Street Journal, Mashable, Forrester, VentureBeat, the New York Times or whoever. What would you like to say to them?

Can’t afford to hire a big sales staff to cold call people who don’t want to talk to you? Easy. Just run ads targeting the competitors of your existing customers. Let’s say that Marriott is your client and you’ve got a great case study there. Run ads targeting the folks who work at Hilton, Starwood, Motel 6 or whoever. You can bet they want to know what their competitors are doing. Inquiring minds want to know!

Making waves with 5 bucks in your pocket

By now, I hope to have shown you that with some ingenuity and $5 in your pocket, you can make some serious waves on Facebook. If you’re a small business or start-up, learn how to master some of the techniques mentioned here. If you’re a big brand and looking to scale, then you’ll need some process and software automation to make this happen across thousands of conversations.

Know of any companies that offer software that will do mass personalization of ad and landing page content? Ad agencies are good at throwing bodies at client accounts — great service, but no scale. Software companies are good at building code based on a predefined set of rules that can be repeated. But success for your company can’t be solved by either a pure agency or a pure software company. The agency can’t throw enough people at the problem and the software company can’t offer a one-size fits all solution to everyone.

Only you can work the magic at your company. As much as we’d like to sell you some software, vendors like us can only assist you in coming up with the creative strategy that resonates best with your customers, the PR strategy that gets the press talking about you, a unique way to position how you solve your client’s pain. Ultimately, these $5 campaigns, whether you run just one of them or 10,000 of them, boil down to a marketing strategy — a unique, compelling message — that we can multiply out to your customers and get those customers to spread on your behalf. (Again, if you’re a smaller company targeting just a few potential or existing clients or partners, go for it yourself!)

In our next segment, we’ll explore that topic in more detail — how to get your fans to do your marketing for you. The techniques that work are probably not what you’d expect, since the world of Facebook relies upon the game dynamics of News Feed Optimization, advertising, applications and Open Graph widgets. We’ll show you how the harder you make it for customers to convert, in certain instances, the more likely they will take action. Stay tuned to learn why.

Read more at www.socialmedia.biz