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Run an effective $5 Facebook campaign

Run an effective $5 Facebook campaign

Amplify’d from www.socialmedia.biz

How to run an effective Facebook campaign for $5

jess3 ad

How to take advantage of the power of microtargeting on Facebook — at a crazy cheap price

dennis-yuLast week there was a buzz in the CEO, Webtrends and CEO, BlitzLocal offices. One of our employees was trying to get my attention. He did so by creating a Facebook ad targeting anyone who lived in Portland, was between 30 and 40 years old and worked at either Webtrends or BlitzLocal. Of the nearly 600 million users on Facebook, only 80 people met that criteria.

It cost him only 6 cents to do it. And for that price, he was able to bombard our people with ads. The cost of that inventory is a 30 cent CPM, which means it costs 30 cents to show a thousand ads. So he was able to send 200 highly targeted messages, as he details in this post on the Facebook Microtargeting trick.

Sounds less like advertising and more like super-targeted email marketing, doesn’t it?

And, in fact, it is, except for this:

• You can send these messages without needing someone’s email address.
• You pay only when someone clicks it (yes, it’s cost per click advertising).
• An impression is guaranteed when the person next opens Facebook (whereas in sending an email, you can only hope that someone will open it).

jess3 campaign

Click to enlarge

Now imagine that you’re a software company like Webtrends, building relationships with other agencies that resell your social analytics software. The founders of the data visualization agency JESS3 come to visit and you’d like to strengthen that bond. Maybe you spend $5 on a micro-targeted campaign like the one above, but slice it up to put the ad image more compactly next to the stats. You absolutely bombard anyone who works at that firm with your message almost 3,000 times. If they have 50 people, that’s 60 ads per person. Who cares that we got only 9 clicks (of which 4 happened to become fans)? The goal is not the click, but the awareness.

Total cost: $5.67 in Facebook ads

Create a specialty video with a customized message

But you could take it a step further, since those folks who do click through on the ad can come to your landing page. So imagine that we send all employees of the email marketing company ExactTarget to this Facebook landing page (warning: there is sound). And how much did this landing page cost? Only $5. We have a network of dozens of freelancers that will do voiceovers, take photos, sing songs or do whatever for a few dollars. More examples of specialty videos here.

Social media success is about pinpoint precision targets — we’re simulating the one-on-one conversations that friends have among themselves

While each of these examples might be clever or interesting, the question becomes: How do you scale this? Social media success is about pinpoint precision targets — ultimately, because we’re simulating the one-on-one conversations that friends have among themselves. But if you want to have 1,000 conversations, you need 1,000 different ads and 1,000 different landing pages. Who has the infrastructure, staff, or the budget to do that?

This is where smart automation comes in. Here’s an example of our scoring platform at work:

Webtrends sells analytics software to the big boys who don’t mind paying $100,000 per year for analytics software. Trouble is that every website needs some form of analytics. Maybe they’ll use Google Analytics — it’s free and pretty good. But we want to talk to only those customers who have the money and need for enterprise analytics software. It would be suicide to buy the keyword “web analytics” on PPC because of all the players that offer web analytics for free or super cheap.

So we took the Fortune 1000 and ran a script that collected a wide range of data — market cap, their industry, annual revenue, P/E ratio, website url, homepage pagerank, pages indexed, Facebook page, number of fans, company logo from Google images and so forth — dozens of metrics. See the detail from our spreadsheet/CSV file below.

Click to enlarge

And then we ran this data through our scoring algorithm to calculate their Social Score — how well they did versus peers in their industry. We might say, “Shell, you got a 56 and rank 7 out of 9 in Oil and Gas.” Or we might say, “Shell, why do you have only 53,548 fans while others in oil and gas have 184k on average?” Then we target people who work at Shell — not just everyone, but those people who have titles of VP of Marketing, Chief Financial Officer, Public Relations and so forth.

There might be only a couple dozen people and not everyone puts their information on Facebook, but it’s enough. And you can bet it gets their attention! They come to a landing page that has their social scoring report, which shows a portion of the metrics that we’ve gathered. But they have to click Like to see the rest of the report, which is grayed out.

Now what happens when that person clicks “Like”? Of course, some of their friends and co-workers see it. And as all curious co-workers will do, they want to check out what you found to be so interesting. And then when these people see our ad, it shows that their friend liked it, which makes our offer of a report that much more credible (image at right).

A move to quality targeting over mass media blasts

Now do you see how this works? It’s quality over quantity, folks. Think about who you want to target as precisely as possible. Where do they work? Where do they live? What kind of car do they drive? What TV shows do they watch? What industry conferences do they attend?

Let Facebook do the work for you, running ads that target journalists who write for the Wall Street Journal, Mashable, Forrester, VentureBeat, the New York Times

Can’t afford $15,000 to exhibit at your favorite conference, plus the $3k to ship the booth out, the cost of the people to have to man the booth during Expo Hall hours, the schwag you have to give out and so forth? Then run an ad for the three weeks leading up to the conference targeting fans of the conference.

Bingo, you’ve now spent $5 to target this audience with your message and you have plenty of time to set up in-person meetings with those folks who are worth talking to, as opposed to any random people who might wander up to visit you at the show. And then you can thank them later.

miva_thank_you

Click to enlarge

Need some PR help, but can’t afford a New York PR agency for $10,000 a month? Then let Facebook do the work for you, running ads that target journalists who write for the Wall Street Journal, Mashable, Forrester, VentureBeat, the New York Times or whoever. What would you like to say to them?

Can’t afford to hire a big sales staff to cold call people who don’t want to talk to you? Easy. Just run ads targeting the competitors of your existing customers. Let’s say that Marriott is your client and you’ve got a great case study there. Run ads targeting the folks who work at Hilton, Starwood, Motel 6 or whoever. You can bet they want to know what their competitors are doing. Inquiring minds want to know!

Making waves with 5 bucks in your pocket

By now, I hope to have shown you that with some ingenuity and $5 in your pocket, you can make some serious waves on Facebook. If you’re a small business or start-up, learn how to master some of the techniques mentioned here. If you’re a big brand and looking to scale, then you’ll need some process and software automation to make this happen across thousands of conversations.

Know of any companies that offer software that will do mass personalization of ad and landing page content? Ad agencies are good at throwing bodies at client accounts — great service, but no scale. Software companies are good at building code based on a predefined set of rules that can be repeated. But success for your company can’t be solved by either a pure agency or a pure software company. The agency can’t throw enough people at the problem and the software company can’t offer a one-size fits all solution to everyone.

Only you can work the magic at your company. As much as we’d like to sell you some software, vendors like us can only assist you in coming up with the creative strategy that resonates best with your customers, the PR strategy that gets the press talking about you, a unique way to position how you solve your client’s pain. Ultimately, these $5 campaigns, whether you run just one of them or 10,000 of them, boil down to a marketing strategy — a unique, compelling message — that we can multiply out to your customers and get those customers to spread on your behalf. (Again, if you’re a smaller company targeting just a few potential or existing clients or partners, go for it yourself!)

In our next segment, we’ll explore that topic in more detail — how to get your fans to do your marketing for you. The techniques that work are probably not what you’d expect, since the world of Facebook relies upon the game dynamics of News Feed Optimization, advertising, applications and Open Graph widgets. We’ll show you how the harder you make it for customers to convert, in certain instances, the more likely they will take action. Stay tuned to learn why.

Read more at www.socialmedia.biz

 

Want to get rid of anything? We're moving and can help relieve your garage of clutter :)

Want to get rid of anything? We're moving and can help relieve your garage of clutter :)

Amplify’d from lukeandjonineedahome.info

moving house from our current place in Redfern/Alexandria up into Willoughby/Chatswood! We’re pretty excited and are planning on moving this Saturday the 18th. (If you have some time to help, we will repay you with pizza and beer!)

As such, we’ve taken stock and there are a few things our new place doesn’t have. If you have any of this stuff that you’d like to get rid of (aka have us take it off your hands), or know anyone who might, please let us know!

Unfortunately we’re just looking for free stuff right now, or items that cost the same as a great deal from eBay.

Things we need!

Appliances:

  • Fridge, but we don’t know dimensions quite yet
  • Microwave
  • Washer and dryer
  • Kettle
  • TV
  • DVD player (preferably with USB)

Furniture:

  • Bookshelves & other storage / shelving
  • Entertainment “centre” for the TV & DVD player
  • Dining chairs
  • Side tables, coffee table, etc.

If you do have any of these things, please let us know! My mobile is 0451 634 526 and Luke’s is 0404 255 632, or email or Facebook us. We can pick them up from you this coming weekend, September 18th/19th, or another time by arrangement.

Thank you everyone for any potential help / ideas / contacts. :)

Joni & Luke

Read more at lukeandjonineedahome.info

 

User Generated Google

User Generated Google

Today on google I noticed that they’ve introduced user generated ranking (like digg or YouTube) and commenting on websites.

Google is really now 2.0, however cliché that may sound.

Furthermore, I’m about to be drowned out by this Football player “Luke Freeman” unless I get some google lovin’ – so sign in to your google account, search for Luke Freeman and let’s see if we can get me back to the top!

Peace out.

P.S. I finally heard back from the guy who owns lukefreeman.com and he bought it in 2002 for his new born son, smart move, but it means I’m never going to get it ;(

You grew up in Australia in the 90s if…

You grew up in Australia in the 90s if…

  1. You watched the ABC more than any other station. Those days are long gone.
  2. You made worms by squeezing your Vegemite or peanut butter crackers together.
  3. The best parties always had fairy bread.
  4. The Waugh twins. Go! Aussie! Go!
  5. Super League almost ruining rugby league in Australia.
  6. Getting the Easter Show guide from the paper and circling all the show bags you wanted.
  7. You thought everyone in America carried a gun and you never wanted to go there because you were were scared you’d get shot.
  8. Blinky Bill, Mr Squiggle and Gumby.
  9. You always used to see that dried out, white dog poo on the footpath. You never see that anymore.
  10. SuperTed, Widget The World Watcher and Samurai Pizza Cats.
  11. Going to the Easter Show with a big group of friends from school once you were old enough to go without Mum and Dad
  12. Doing research for school projects by going to the library or looking up an encyclopaedia rather than using the internet.
  13. Brian Henderson and Richard Morecroft reading the news.
  14. Paul Keating was some guy that ran the country and John Howard became the only PM you really ever knew because you were too young to care before that.
  15. Banana Man, Bangers and Mash and The Raggy Dolls.
  16. Game Boy.
  17. Waking up early everyday to watch Agro’s Cartoon Connection or Cheez TV.
  18. Hey Hey It’s Saturday.
  19. Everyone got the Coke bag at the Easter Show and it was only $10.
  20. Buying those 6 packs of Coco Pops, Fruit Loops, Frosties, Rice Bubbles, Nutri-Grain and Corn Flakes so you could have a different one each day and then opening the packets really carefully and removing the cereal so you’d have a mini wardrobe afterwards. You also most probably just let your parents eat the Corn Flakes.
  21. Trying to make the Rainbow Road shortcut on Mario Kart 64.
  22. Postman Pat, Fireman Sam and Lift Off (that show with the dirty, eye-less doll named EC).
  23. Playing GoldenEye on the Nintendo 64 and arguing over whether Oddjob was allowed to be used in multiplayer.
  24. The original Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles.
  25. Super International Cricket on the SNES.
  26. Arguing over which was better – Nintendo 64 or PlayStation.
  27. Don’t push me, push a push pop!
  28. Nobody made “not” jokes… NOT!!
  29. Bathurst stopped being Holden vs. Ford and all those European cars came in until they came to their senses.
  30. Who shot Mr Burns?
  31. Watching Captain Planet and then driving your parents mad by always singing the song.
  32. That’s so funny, I forgot to laugh.
  33. WWE was WWF and they actually had cool wrestlers like The Rock, Mankind and Stone Cold Steve Austin.
  34. Playing Gran Turismo and MGS on PlayStation.
  35. Roller coasters at Wonderland, Sydney.
  36. You decorated your room with glow-in-the-dark stickers.
  37. SBS didn’t have any ads. Not that you ever watched it anyway, except maybe for softcore porn.
  38. You played marbles and could name all the different types like blue moon, oily, candy, red wine, galaxy and red devil. You never played anyone for your god marble.
  39. Feeling sad when your Tamagotchi died.
  40. Singing “a ram sam sam, a ram sam sam, guli guli guli guli guli, ram sam sam, a rafi, a rafi, guli guli guli guli guli ram sam sam”.
  41. Seeing a small rack of DVDs in the video store and wondering if anyone ever rented them.
  42. Dolly the sheep.
  43. Getting up early to watch the Rage Top 50.
  44. Friends when they were all actually just friends. Why didn’t Phoebe and Joey get together?
  45. Sonic the Hedgehog.
  46. Watching The Simpsons back when it was funny, every night on Channel 10.
  47. Power Rangers becoming cooler than the Ninja Turtles, even though the Turtles will always be cooler.
  48. Watching South Park for the first time and being really excited by all the swearing.
  49. Watching Hercules and then being disappointed when Xena Warrior Princess replaced it. Nobody was cooler than Herc.
  50. Blowing on the Nintendo cartridge before putting it in the console to make sure it worked properly.
  51. Smell the cheese.
  52. Vulcan, Tower, Flame… Australian Gladiators.
  53. Playing Mortal Kombat and trying to do a fatality but just ending up punching accidentally.
  54. Pokemon! Gotta catch ‘em all!
  55. Watching Hey Dad! and then seeing little Arthur McArthur go on to star in that famous Sorbent ad.
  56. Full Frontal, not Comedy Inc.
  57. Wolfenstein, Doom and Duke Nukem.
  58. Downloading music from Napster.
  59. Chatting with your buddies on ICQ.
  60. Going to see Titanic.
  61. The winner is…Sydney.
  62. Mighty Max and Polly Pocket. Max and Polly always got lost because they were so bloody small.
  63. Fox Mulder and Dana Scully.
  64. Waiting for Tony “Plugger” Lockett to break that record.
  65. Australia didn’t always win the cricket.
  66. The Socceroos couldn’t qualify for the World Cup.
  67. John Eales captained the Wallabies and we won the World Cup.
  68. Ray Martin hosted A Current Affair.
  69. Zoopa Doopa ice blocks were only 20c and if you couldn’t afford it, you asked the canteen lady to cut it in half so you could split it with a friend.
  70. Listening to boy bands like Human Nature and girl bands like Girlfriend.
  71. Barbie, not Bratz.
  72. The Spice Girls.
  73. Happy Meals were only $2.95 and the toys were simple but actually good.
  74. Person 1: Who farted!? – Person 2: Whoever smelt it, dealt it! – Person 1: Whoever made the rhyme, commited the crime!
  75. Brad Fittler was the best in the world.
  76. Thorpe won lots of gold medals and wasn’t so gay.
  77. Opposite day.
  78. We all loved Pat Rafter and almost cried when he lost to Goran Ivanisevic because our Pat deserved that title more than anyone. Definitely more than Hewitt ever did.
  79. Playing tackle Bull Rush at lunchtime and having tackling banned. You had to resort to grab 1-2-3 or tip. Same goes for footy.
  80. Giving a friend a backage in the canteen line. If it was your best friend, you gave them a frontage.
  81. Pogs and Looney Tunes Tazos.
  82. Nobody won Wimbledon unless their name was Pete Sampras.
  83. You laughed at the fat kid on the Cottees cordial ad and changed the song to “My Dad picks his nose…”
  84. You ate Smarties instead of M&M’s.
  85. You tried Dr. Pepper and hated it.
  86. Service stations didn’t need space for 4 digits on their petrol prices signs.
  87. Girl germs! Boy germs!
  88. Goosebumps.
  89. You had to actually call your friends rather than send them an SMS.
  90. Wearing a Chicago Bulls T-shirt or cap. Wearing the cap backwards.
  91. Arguing over who got to be Warnie in backyard cricket. Six and out!
  92. Paul Jennings’Gizmo books.
  93. Matchbox cars.
  94. The feeling of wonder you got, the first time you were able to see the image in one of those Magic Eye 3D pictures.
  95. The Secret World of Alex Mack.
  96. Talk to the hand!
  97. Johnson and Friends, Noddy and Humphrey B. Bear.
  98. You wished you had enough Lego to build those amazing cities they displayed in the brochures.
  99. Collecting Yowie toys. Aussie wildlife was way cooler than any stupid Kinder Surprise toy.
  100. Playing truth or dare with your secret crush.
  101. Mark Taylor equalling Don Bradman’s record.
  102. Slap bracelets.
  103. Jurassic Park and those toy dinosaurs where you could pull a piece of the skin out to see its insides.
  104. Roger Ramjet, he’s our man, hero of our nation.
  105. We had paper money.
  106. Telling those Dobbers where to stick it by singing, “Dibba dobba dibba dobba number nine, wearing nappies all the time” and, “Dibba dobba Cindy went to kindy, stepped on a bindy wa wa wa.”
  107. Good on ya Mum! Tip Top’s the one!
  108. You could buy more than enough food from the school cantee
    n
    for only $2.
  109. Begging your parents to go to McDonald’s for dinner.
  110. Rocko’s Modern Life, Rugrats and Hey Arnold!
  111. Noni, Monica and that bald guy named George on Play School.
  112. Going to World 4 Kids to look at all the toys.
  113. Watching The Lion King and feeling Simba’s pain when Mufasa died. Disney just doesn’t make them like that anymore.
  114. Soft serve cones were only 30c and they never tried to up-sell a Flake because they didn’t have it.
  115. Wanting a Brain or Silver Bullet during the yo-yo craze.
  116. Nesquik without the Nes.
  117. Troll Dolls.
  118. The Kids’ Works at Pizza Hut with unlimited drink refills. You made an ice cream mountain covered in choc chips and marshmallows and could never finish it.
  119. Thomas the Tank Engine and TUGS.
  120. Ba-na-na-na-na! Ba-na-na-na-na! Make those bodies sing!
  121. You had to get your photos developed.
  122. Your family didn’t own a 4WD unless it was a real one like a Land Cruiser or Patrol. Range Rovers were tough and nobody thought BMW would make a 4WD, let alone Porsche.
  123. Street Sharks and Biker Mice From Mars
  124. Competing with your friends to see who could eat the most sour Warheads in one go.
  125. The Channel 9 logo had dots next to it and the Channel 7 logo wasn’t a folded piece of paper.
  126. No Hat, no play.
  127. Dr. Dreadful Food Labs. Kids these days wouldn’t be allowed that because its not healthy enough. We didn’t give a shit about our health in the 90’s.
  128. High five! Up high, down low, too slow!
  129. Watching Round the Twist and getting pissed off that the actors kept on changing. You still loved it though.
  130. Cheating in Heads Down, Thumbs Up.
  131. Watching that game show called Vidiot. Game shows didn’t have to be educational back then, like That’s Academic… that show sucks.
  132. Collecting basketball cards, whether you followed basketball or not.
  133. You always wished your parents had bought you a bigger Super Soaker for Christmas. Christmas is hot in Australia… the more water, the better.
  134. Collecting hundreds of tickets from Timezone just so you could trade them for some crappy prize that you could have bought from Woolies for ten bucks.
  135. Healthy Harold day was the best because you got to miss class to sit in a tiny caravan and listen to a talking giraffe.
  136. Playing handball with Ace, King, Queen and Dunce and making up stupid rules as you went along.
  137. Skipping ropes and Jump Rope for Heart Day.
  138. Chewing the crappy gum in Bubble-O-Bill’s nose and wishing they could just use Hubba Bubba instead.
  139. A*mazing.
  140. The Ferals. Rattus, Modigliana, Derryn and Mixy were cool until they started that five minute piece of crap, Feral TV.
  141. Hypercolour T-shirts.
  142. Who Dares! Who Dares! Who Dares Wins!
  143. Having your very own Dollarmites account and getting really excited when you earned a tiny bit of interest.
  144. Growing up in Australia in the 90’s was rad.

Via: Facebook