Tag: digital

Join Australia's fastest growing digital performance agency – Downstream

Join Australia's fastest growing digital performance agency – Downstream

Message me if your keen.

Downstream Marketing is Australia’s largest and faster growing strategic Search Marketing agency. Recently we’ve extended our offering from Search to include biddable display and performance creative.

Because of our ongoing success, we are looking for high caliber candidates to join our team.

If you have a passion for digital, data and direct marketing, Downstream could be an agency where you can grow your career in the fast paced, ever changing world of Search and performance digital marketing. Downstream is a values based organization that recognizes team members based on their output, not input. We believe in operating under the principals of “freedom within boundaries” and actively encourage all staff members to excel in both their careers and non-work life.

If you are passionate about crafting the career you want, being a member of a collaborative team and pushing your own personal boundaries, Downstream may be the right fit for you. Detailed below are career opportunities currently on offer.

Read more at www.downstreamonline.com.au

 

Online TV: Good press 4 @DownstreamTweet

Online TV: Good press 4 @DownstreamTweet

Amplify’d from www.smh.com.au
Online TV ads to be traded in auction-style exchanges

ADVERTISERS will be able to bid for television-style ads online across multiple websites by the end of the year, though it could be up to three years before the market represents a large chunk of the $2.2 billion online ad market.

Downstream Marketing and the media-buying consortium Group M say the technology for trading ads placed before, during or after online videos will be in place by December.

Already a small but growing volume of online display ads are bought and sold through exchanges or demand side-platforms run by media-buying groups, or by larger networks such as Google.

Television commercials viewed online is the next sector to become biddable – that is, when ads can be sold in automated, split-second, auction-style trades.

Media executives might be fearful, the media investor Daniel Petre says, but they will have to get used to it.

”As soon as the technology is there advertising will be wrapped in it,” Downstream’s chief executive, Steve Knowles, says.

”More and more people are demanding content online so whether it’s Apple TV, Google, Netflix, the television networks or Facebook that provides it doesn’t really matter. There will be advertising and it will be biddable.”

Rather than sell such ads on a traditional cost per thousand (CPM) model, agencies such as Downstream say they can draw on data such as the websites people visit, the forms they fill in and possibly even their purchasing history online to target specific audience niches with clients’ TVCs. Media agencies can specify a target audience and the maximum price they are prepared to pay for those eyeballs.

“It’s bringing rational pricing to [online] TV,” said Downstream’s chief operating officer, Justin Hind.

Although watching TV shows or films online makes up less than 5 per cent of total viewing, it is predicted to grow rapidly as more TVs are connected to a high-speed internet.

Online video advertising is currently a $33 million market – a relative minnow – but which Frost & Sullivan predict will be worth $180 million by 2015.

Danny Bass, the chief digital officer for the media buying consortium Group M, will sell video ads this way through its demand side platform by the year’s end. But he could not predict what volumes might be traded. “The more inventory that becomes available the more likely it is fall to an exchange.”

Downstream backer Mr Petre, the chairman of Netus, an investment company backed by News Ltd, said an auction-style trading platform did not necessarily mean rates would fall.

“There is a fear that everything that goes through an exchange will go to 50¢ a CPM but if you are delivering valuable content then that won’t be the case,” said Mr Petre, who also sits on the board of Nine Entertainment Co, which has a half-share in Ninemsn.

“People will resist it because they are fearful but in the end advertisers will love it because at last they will pay for advertising that performs well. At last the most appropriate ad is shown to the most appropriate audience.”

Read more at www.smh.com.au

 

Good to see one of my clients (GetPrice) getting a good wrap for our SEM campaign

Good to see one of my clients (GetPrice) getting a good wrap for our SEM campaign

The traditional retailers didn’t come off to well, but sites such as GetPrice with millions of long-tail keywords and targeted ad copies across multiple search engines are getting a great wrap for consumer experience and visibility.

Amplify’d from digitalministry.com

Google AdWords – Aussie Retailers Behind the Eight Ball

Written by Sean Wyld | January 31st 2011 What is your opinion?

With the hundreds of millions of dollars spent each year on advertising by the major electrical retailers, why do the likes of Harvey Norman, JB Hi Fi, Dick Smith, Myer and Co seem more interested in complaining about GST then utilising Google AdWords effectively? And why aren’t the leading online retailers like Deals Direct and OO.com.au maximising the opportunity?

Walk into your local JB Hi Fi, Harvey Norman or Dick Smith and tell them you’re interested in buying a Samsung UA55C9000.  The sales person will take you to the TV section show you a shiny new Samsung UA55C9000 55” LED TV, tell you the price and tell you how much better your life will be with it sitting in your living room.

Now try the same thing online.  Go to Google.com.au and search for Samsung UA55C9000:

Out of all of the retailers in Australia, how many are interested in selling you a Samsung UA55C9000 TV, e.g. how many have an Google AdWords ad? Only one, the Electrical Discounter.  An honourable mention to price comparison sites, Get Price and Price Dumper and a thanks for playing to Optus with an ad for the right brand but wrong product.  With the hundreds of millions of advertising dollars spent each year by the major electrical retailers, where are the likes of Harvey Norman, JB Hi Fi, Dick Smith and Myer?  Or for that matter, where are the leading Australian online retailers like Deals Direct, OO.com.au and Dstore?

Read more at digitalministry.com

Finally updated my résumé to include my current job @ Downstream.

Finally updated my résumé to include my current job @ Downstream.

Included my current work:

Currently I am working at Downstream Marketing, a digital performance marketing agency in Sydney’s CBD. My primary role as an Account Executive involves setting up and managing pay-per-click (PPC) search engine marketing (SEM), performance display and social media campaigns and consulting on web design for conversion driven landing pages. As part of this process I regularly host client meetings and performance reviews as well as setting up an array of reporting, analysis and optimisation systems and processes. Clients during my time at Downstream include: American Express, GetPrice, JumpOnIt, National Australia Bank (Share Trading), Budget, AAMI, JustCar, InsureMyRide, Shannons, eHarmony, Freelancer.com, iiNet, Insuranceline, Informa, Live In Australia, Jetabroad and Bingle.

Consumers want a car. TV studios give pogo sticks. Doesn’t turn us into pogo-stick fanciers…

Consumers want a car. TV studios give pogo sticks. Doesn’t turn us into pogo-stick fanciers…

Great article about apples new line up, particularly this part about IPTV.

Amplify’d from www.suntimes.com

Digital music stores work because it’s one-stop shopping, whether you shop at iTunes, Amazon’s MP3 Store, or Rhapsody. If I want a specific album, I don’t have to first ask “What label was that recorded under?” and then “Which one of the following thirteen incompatible music stores is partially owned by that label?”

But that’s the problem we face with Internet TV. Which might kill the whole thing before it even gets on its feet. iTunes and Hulu’s strongest competition comes in the form of apps that make it trivially simple to locate the latest episodes of every TV show ever broadcast, posted on any filesharing site or service.

You want last week’s episode of “Dancing With The 19 Kids Of Cake Decorators?” You got it.

It’s illegal, sure. But it’s free and more importantly: it works.

Consumers want a car. The TV studios give us a pogo stick. It doesn’t turn us into pogo-stick fanciers. It turns us into car thieves. Please CC this comment to anybody you know in the television industry.

Read more at www.suntimes.com

 

Downstream is still looking to hire, #SEM Assistants/Managers – GREAT place to work, good benefits

Downstream is still looking to hire, #SEM Assistants/Managers – GREAT place to work, good benefits

Downstream Marketing is Australia’s largest and faster growing strategic Search Marketing agency. Awarded B&T’s Emerging Agency of the Year for 2008, we were recognized as the best of the best amongst all marketing services agencies and disciplines. Because of our ongoing success, we are looking for high caliber candidates to join our team.

If you have a passion for digital, data and direct marketing, Downstream could be an agency where you can grow your career in the fast paced, ever changing world of Search and performance digital marketing. Downstream is a values based organization that recognizes team members based on their output, not input. We believe in operating under the principals of “freedom within boundaries” and actively encourage all staff members to excel in both their careers and non-work life.

If you are passionate about crafting the career you want, being a member of a collaborative team and pushing your own personal boundaries, Downstream may be the right fit for you. Detailed below are career opportunities currently on offer.

WorldSocial.net

WorldSocial.net

The Worldwide Social Network

The real “social” network…because change is possible

I’m looking for partners to help build WorldSocial.net

It is going to be a full-featured collaborative open source social networking and management tool that will also provide a back-end platform for organisations, individuals, causes or events to incorporate into their own sites and customise for their own profiles.

Problems

  • Thousands of NGOs focus on issues ranging from sustainability and humanitarianism through to political reform and education
  • Difficulty motivating cross pollination
  • Not enough time, funding or people
  • Organisations constantly reinvent the wheel
  • Lack of enabling tools
    Old methods of communication cannot handle this and new ones are proprietary, incompatible and too numerous.

Opportunities

  • Rise of social media and online tools: Facebook, Twitter, Meeting Wizard, Wikipedia, MySpace, Google tools etc..
  • Economic recession provides need for innovation and incentives for collaboration

Market

  • Governments and grant-giving bodies looking to put money to its most effective use
  • Corporations willing to make progressive changes, but need partnerships to take the plunge
  • Thousand of organisations and causes that need resources, membership/event management, collaboration tools and networking opportunities
  • Millions of individuals looking to volunteer, donate, make changes and have an active role in shaping their world

Features

  • Management tools: membership, events, petitions, meeting wizards, grants, volunteer, employment,
  • notifications and management for both physical and digital resources.
  • Information integration: articles, blogs, studies, collaborative encyclopaedia, press releases, videos, tweets and status updates.
  • Relevance algorithms
  • Networking tools
  • Profiles: interests, events attended, education, affiliations, resume etc…
  • Geographical integration.
  • Online meeting, conference and collaboration tools

Scenario 1: Physical Resources

Get Out The Vote wants to run a campaign in the interior of Canada but their offices are in the major cities.
They have a few supporters out in the country.
Those supporters search for organisations in their local area that would allow them to use printing equipment.

Scenario 2: Digital Resources

Joe Smith from Vancouver wants to run a program for troubled teenage boys in high school.
He searches WorldSocial and finds the “No Limits” course which was run in Sydney.
He downloads it, adapts it and tries it.
Later on he uploads it to share on WorldSocial, along with photos and videos too!

Scenario 3: Individual Support

Mary Stephens from Newcastle wants to donate some time and money to help her community.
She fills out a survey on WorldSocial about her interests and values.
Later on, she is notified about the details of several events in her neighbourhood.
Also, her $20 donation was split between the 7 organisations that she approved upon the survey’s suggestion.

Scenario 4: Group Websites

Macquarie University Sustainability Society wants to create a website for their members.
They log in to WorldSocial, start a group and then customise a website that works in realtime with the Worldsocial database.
This time they decide to go for customised template with their own URL.
Now they can organise events and meetings, collect membership fees and donations, share their work, apply for grants and syndicate information about local sustainability groups!

Scenario 5: Online Grants

The New York City Council are looking to support social enterprise businesses in the Manhattan area.
They create a grant listing on WorldSocial and wait for applicants to create profiles and apply.
Later on they view all their applicants profiles and user recommendations on WorldSocial!

Group Networks

Groups are much more networked than we think – here’s just a quick overview of the simple relationships.

What is already there?

Facebook, Craigslist, Digg, MySpace, Google Maps, Skype, LinkedIn, Google Docs, Taking IT Global, Meeting Wizard, Livejournal, Flickr, Wikipedia, WordPress, YouTube, Twitter, Blogger, GetUp…

What are they lacking?

  • Integration
  • Centralised database
  • Synchronisation
  • Full features
  • Open source
  • Co-operation
  • Customisable front-end
  • Expandability
  • Collaboration
  • Full syndication

Challenges

  • Getting financial support for an unknown entity in times of economic recession
  • Reluctancy to support something that wasn’t started in-house
  • Creating something this big will be very hard, but there is no point in doing it unless we aim big.
  • Current tools do parts of this and the need for a full-featured collaborative and open tool may not be obvious.

WorldSocial.net

A full-featured collaborative open source social networking and management tool that will also provide a back-end platform for organisations, individuals, causes or events to incorporate into their own sites and customise for their own profiles.

Communication and collaboration are the most effective means for change!

Digital Cinema Evaluated – Essay

Digital Cinema Evaluated – Essay

I’ve been doing an essay on Digital Cinema, there is some pretty interesting stuff out there and how it is probably going to affect us… I would really love to see cinemas start to screen more alternative content (e.g. live concerts and independent films!!!) and I look forward to the idea that small independent cinemas might pop up with interesting content (Mac Uni already screens stuff in one of their lecture halls).

Its a long read and not quite an interesting journaistic style, but I’ll leave it here for future reference.

The rise of digital independence

The introduction of digital technology arguably represents the most exhaustive technical and social changes in the history of cinema, greater than both sound and colour (Ford 2005). In analysing who benefits from the proliferation of digital cinema, it is helpful to review it in the context of the traditional film making process and then to define digital cinema in regard to this. Developments in digital media are having a significant impact on the spectrum of cinema production (filming, editing and effects) and distribution (printing, shipping and screening). This results in both positive and negative ramifications that can be addressed in relation to a number of recent Australian films with digital processes.

The world of cinema began to change with the advent of films like the original “Star Wars“ (Associated Press 2005) which pioneered and developed digital editing and rendering techniques. This explosion has led not only to digital film industry but also the proliferation of technologies as video games, DVDs and video podcasts (Manovich 2007). Digital technology has also allowed the possibility of interactivity (e.g. alternate endings on DVDs), however this essay will instead focus on the feature/short film productions which are designed to be projected in a theatre.

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