Tag: campaign

Google AdWords Description Line Appearing in Headline

Google AdWords Description Line Appearing in Headline

Update (June 2011): Google has now enabled embedded sitelinks.

Update (May 2011): Google is now putting the URL after the headline if there is space.

Update (Feb 2011): Google wrote a post about it for more information.

I was doing a test search for a campaign I was setting up today and noticed that the description line 1 was showing up right after the headline on Google Adwords. Apparently they’ve been testing it around the world for a while and is now showing up intermittently here (see this article).

Update: It looks like your ads will do it if description line one is a complete sentence (i.e. ends in “.” or “?” or “!”).

Good to see one of my clients (GetPrice) getting a good wrap for our SEM campaign

Good to see one of my clients (GetPrice) getting a good wrap for our SEM campaign

The traditional retailers didn’t come off to well, but sites such as GetPrice with millions of long-tail keywords and targeted ad copies across multiple search engines are getting a great wrap for consumer experience and visibility.

Amplify’d from digitalministry.com

Google AdWords – Aussie Retailers Behind the Eight Ball

Written by Sean Wyld | January 31st 2011 What is your opinion?

With the hundreds of millions of dollars spent each year on advertising by the major electrical retailers, why do the likes of Harvey Norman, JB Hi Fi, Dick Smith, Myer and Co seem more interested in complaining about GST then utilising Google AdWords effectively? And why aren’t the leading online retailers like Deals Direct and OO.com.au maximising the opportunity?

Walk into your local JB Hi Fi, Harvey Norman or Dick Smith and tell them you’re interested in buying a Samsung UA55C9000.  The sales person will take you to the TV section show you a shiny new Samsung UA55C9000 55” LED TV, tell you the price and tell you how much better your life will be with it sitting in your living room.

Now try the same thing online.  Go to Google.com.au and search for Samsung UA55C9000:

Out of all of the retailers in Australia, how many are interested in selling you a Samsung UA55C9000 TV, e.g. how many have an Google AdWords ad? Only one, the Electrical Discounter.  An honourable mention to price comparison sites, Get Price and Price Dumper and a thanks for playing to Optus with an ad for the right brand but wrong product.  With the hundreds of millions of advertising dollars spent each year by the major electrical retailers, where are the likes of Harvey Norman, JB Hi Fi, Dick Smith and Myer?  Or for that matter, where are the leading Australian online retailers like Deals Direct, OO.com.au and Dstore?

Read more at digitalministry.com

Facebook ad formats getting more social

Facebook ad formats getting more social

(via www.clickz.com)

Facebook has launched “Sponsored Stories” ads, which let marketers utilize messages from their “likes” community for paid promotions on the site. The ads contain word-for-word Facebook user posts, while appearing in the right-hand column with other paid promotions on the website.

A bevy of launch partners have already readied campaigns involving the new ads. They include Coca Cola, Levi’s, and Anheuser Busch, as well as nonprofits like Amnesty International, UNICEF, Autism Speaks, and Women for Women.

Jim Squires, marketing products manager for the Palo Alto, CA-based social giant, told ClickZ that Sponsored Stories will be available on the site’s self-service platform in a comparable manner to other ads. They will be purchased on an impression- or per-click basis, he said.

For a brand like Starbucks, an endorsement that looks like this:

starbucks-sponsored1

May appear in an ad unit like this:

starbucks-sponsored

“Essentially, the recommended approach is to use [them] in conjunction with a campaign you are already running,” Squires said. “So, you say, ‘I want to add Sponsored Stories to this.’ In that case, when a Sponsored Story is able to show, it is showing [instead of] the controlled advertiser message.”

Read more at www.clickz.com

Good article explaining retargeting/remarketing

Good article explaining retargeting/remarketing

This is a good article explaining retargeting/remarketing. We use it regularly on EF & AdWords through Search and Display with a lot of success.

Amplify’d from searchenginewatch.com
If you spend “a lot of money” on your clients’ paid search programs or any other marketing program, this is your opportunity to increase their campaign ROI by making an effort to recapture the missed opportunities a second, third, or umteenth time. In most cases retargeting campaigns outperform search marketing campaigns (in a silo).

Read more at searchenginewatch.com

 

Finally updated my résumé to include my current job @ Downstream.

Finally updated my résumé to include my current job @ Downstream.

Included my current work:

Currently I am working at Downstream Marketing, a digital performance marketing agency in Sydney’s CBD. My primary role as an Account Executive involves setting up and managing pay-per-click (PPC) search engine marketing (SEM), performance display and social media campaigns and consulting on web design for conversion driven landing pages. As part of this process I regularly host client meetings and performance reviews as well as setting up an array of reporting, analysis and optimisation systems and processes. Clients during my time at Downstream include: American Express, GetPrice, JumpOnIt, National Australia Bank (Share Trading), Budget, AAMI, JustCar, InsureMyRide, Shannons, eHarmony, Freelancer.com, iiNet, Insuranceline, Informa, Live In Australia, Jetabroad and Bingle.

Are British Columbians mathematically challenged?

Are British Columbians mathematically challenged?

I awoke this morning to read yet another article about the perceived complexity of the BC-STV. In Terry O’Neill’s article in The Tri-City News he stated that he “can’t fathom the complicated vote-counting mechanism it employs.”

Throughout the campaign we’ve heard political pundits and former politicians like Bill Tieleman and David Schreck state outright that they were not capable of understanding it.

I’m a born and bred Aussie and most people in BC that I know are pretty smart. Why do so many people fear something my brother could explain to someone his age when he was 12? He’s a smart kid, but certainly no genius.

Back home, our elementary schools often use STV for their student council elections. The ballots are cast and counted by kids younger than 12. Is the NO-STV campaign insulting the intelligence of British Columbians?

Furthermore, why is something that is complex bad? Say the BC-STV was not complex and it used the old Irish system of randomly selecting the surplus ballots to transfer the value, would it not be accused of leaving things up to chance?

In not one single place where STV is used has it been retracted due to people not understanding it.

People around the world are looking to BC to see if they can do what no one else has done: institute an electoral system chosen and designed by ordinary people. I would rather something that is intricately designed to be fair than something that is made simple and unfair. Wouldn’t you?

Remember, the BC-STV needs 60% of the provincial vote to pass. This supermajority requirement can only be linked to the direct intention of failure on behalf of the legislature.

Change is difficult for politicians. Change comes from those on ground.

For more information, read my thesis – Closing the Gap in Deliberative Democracy:? The Importance of Communication in the?Post-Deliberative Process

Set up to fail? Democracy or plutocracy?

Set up to fail? Democracy or plutocracy?

Recent anomalies in British Columbian and Canadian election results have re-ignited electoral reform as a prominent topic of debate. The British Columbian Citizens’ Assembly on Electoral Reform in 2004 was the first successful implementation of deliberative democracy with directly legislated decision-making powers.

The assembly’s recommended voting system, the British Columbian Single-Transferable-Vote (or BC-STV), was supported by 95% of its members. However, the final recommendation was subject to a provincial referendum which only garnered 57.7% of support province-wide, falling 2.3% short of the 60% supermajority required to pass – demonstrating a vast disparity compared to its support within the Citizens’ Assembly.

Recently, I have been flooded with articles and opinions saying that BC rejected STV in the last referendum. However, I cannot possibly fathom how this argument can be legitimately made. It looks to me that BC accepted STV with a landslide in political terms. Just four years earlier, in 2001, the liberals had a “landslide victory” with 77 out of 79 seats from 57.6% of the popular vote – less than STV had when it “failed” to gain acceptance.

People from the NO-STV campaign have been kicking and screaming about the possibility of a minority getting input in making decisions. Do they not realise that they were the minority in 2005 that stopped the majority (57.7%) getting the change that they voted for?

The assembly process was designed by Hon. Gordon Gibson, a former politician and recipient of the Order of British Columbia. Following Gibson’s recommendations, the Legislative Assembly of British Columbia (with 77 of the 79 seats held by BC Liberals) had the final say on enacting it. The legislature included additional rules such as a 60% supermajority of the popular vote through a referendum process. The only public communication planned for the final design was a leaflet that was mailed to every house in the province five-months before the referendum.

Leading up to the 2005 referendum there was almost no campaign whatsoever and there was a strong anti-STV sentiment within the media pundits. Considering the inherent restraints and direct opposition, the Citizens’ Assembly and the electorate of British Columbia can be applauded for the success of 57.7% provincial support.

So I have a few questions.

What does the discrepancy between the Citizens’ Assembly support compared to that of the public referendum support say about the process? The assembly members were chosen from the general public. Why did the recommendation not ultimately pass at voting time? Were these eleven months and 5.5 million dollars of taxpayers’ money well spent? Was this a very expensive stunt or will it finally lead to much needed change in BC?

It’s now come to crunch time and the citizens’ of BC can either be lead into fear by those who’s interests are protected by the current FPTP system, or they can take steps of faith and lead the way for the world in adopting a system that was designed for the people, by the people, with the support of the people.

For more information read my thesis – Closing the Gap in Deliberative Democracy:? The Importance of Communication in the?Post-Deliberative Process

WorldSocial.net

WorldSocial.net

The Worldwide Social Network

The real “social” network…because change is possible

I’m looking for partners to help build WorldSocial.net

It is going to be a full-featured collaborative open source social networking and management tool that will also provide a back-end platform for organisations, individuals, causes or events to incorporate into their own sites and customise for their own profiles.

Problems

  • Thousands of NGOs focus on issues ranging from sustainability and humanitarianism through to political reform and education
  • Difficulty motivating cross pollination
  • Not enough time, funding or people
  • Organisations constantly reinvent the wheel
  • Lack of enabling tools
    Old methods of communication cannot handle this and new ones are proprietary, incompatible and too numerous.

Opportunities

  • Rise of social media and online tools: Facebook, Twitter, Meeting Wizard, Wikipedia, MySpace, Google tools etc..
  • Economic recession provides need for innovation and incentives for collaboration

Market

  • Governments and grant-giving bodies looking to put money to its most effective use
  • Corporations willing to make progressive changes, but need partnerships to take the plunge
  • Thousand of organisations and causes that need resources, membership/event management, collaboration tools and networking opportunities
  • Millions of individuals looking to volunteer, donate, make changes and have an active role in shaping their world

Features

  • Management tools: membership, events, petitions, meeting wizards, grants, volunteer, employment,
  • notifications and management for both physical and digital resources.
  • Information integration: articles, blogs, studies, collaborative encyclopaedia, press releases, videos, tweets and status updates.
  • Relevance algorithms
  • Networking tools
  • Profiles: interests, events attended, education, affiliations, resume etc…
  • Geographical integration.
  • Online meeting, conference and collaboration tools

Scenario 1: Physical Resources

Get Out The Vote wants to run a campaign in the interior of Canada but their offices are in the major cities.
They have a few supporters out in the country.
Those supporters search for organisations in their local area that would allow them to use printing equipment.

Scenario 2: Digital Resources

Joe Smith from Vancouver wants to run a program for troubled teenage boys in high school.
He searches WorldSocial and finds the “No Limits” course which was run in Sydney.
He downloads it, adapts it and tries it.
Later on he uploads it to share on WorldSocial, along with photos and videos too!

Scenario 3: Individual Support

Mary Stephens from Newcastle wants to donate some time and money to help her community.
She fills out a survey on WorldSocial about her interests and values.
Later on, she is notified about the details of several events in her neighbourhood.
Also, her $20 donation was split between the 7 organisations that she approved upon the survey’s suggestion.

Scenario 4: Group Websites

Macquarie University Sustainability Society wants to create a website for their members.
They log in to WorldSocial, start a group and then customise a website that works in realtime with the Worldsocial database.
This time they decide to go for customised template with their own URL.
Now they can organise events and meetings, collect membership fees and donations, share their work, apply for grants and syndicate information about local sustainability groups!

Scenario 5: Online Grants

The New York City Council are looking to support social enterprise businesses in the Manhattan area.
They create a grant listing on WorldSocial and wait for applicants to create profiles and apply.
Later on they view all their applicants profiles and user recommendations on WorldSocial!

Group Networks

Groups are much more networked than we think – here’s just a quick overview of the simple relationships.

What is already there?

Facebook, Craigslist, Digg, MySpace, Google Maps, Skype, LinkedIn, Google Docs, Taking IT Global, Meeting Wizard, Livejournal, Flickr, Wikipedia, WordPress, YouTube, Twitter, Blogger, GetUp…

What are they lacking?

  • Integration
  • Centralised database
  • Synchronisation
  • Full features
  • Open source
  • Co-operation
  • Customisable front-end
  • Expandability
  • Collaboration
  • Full syndication

Challenges

  • Getting financial support for an unknown entity in times of economic recession
  • Reluctancy to support something that wasn’t started in-house
  • Creating something this big will be very hard, but there is no point in doing it unless we aim big.
  • Current tools do parts of this and the need for a full-featured collaborative and open tool may not be obvious.

WorldSocial.net

A full-featured collaborative open source social networking and management tool that will also provide a back-end platform for organisations, individuals, causes or events to incorporate into their own sites and customise for their own profiles.

Communication and collaboration are the most effective means for change!