Tag: advertiser

Google to increase AdWords account limits to 500 campaigns…

Google to increase AdWords account limits to 500 campaigns…

As many adwords professionals know, there is a soft limit in Google AdWords of about 40,000 keywords (it changes every now and then) and then there is a hard limit of 100 campaigns, 5,000 adgroups per campaign and a total of 1 million keywords (including negatives).

The hard limit is often available to agencies upon request to your account manager from Google.

Today I got an email saying that over the next few weeks Adwords will be updated in to reflect this new system of account limits:

  • 500 campaigns (active and paused)
  • 20,000 ad groups (per campaign)
  • 3 million KWs/placements/topics/audiences (active and paused per account).

Unfortunately Yahoo/Bing still has much smaller limits, and most advertisers have already set up separate Google accounts to account for hundreds of campaigns, but still it provides hope for the future.

The uncanny valley of advertising. Ads too-targeted, not targeted enough, or just poorly targeted.

The uncanny valley of advertising. Ads too-targeted, not targeted enough, or just poorly targeted.

Amplify’d from blogs.reuters.com

The uncanny valley of advertising

From an economic point of view, improvements in ad-targeting technology seem as though they’re pretty obviously Pareto-optimal: everybody benefits. Advertisers get to waste fewer of their ad dollars putting messages in front of people they don’t want to reach; publishers get to charge more money; and consumers get to see only things which are germane and relevant to them.

So why is it that many people hate ad targeting, and hate being served targeted ads?

Part of the reason, I think, is just that targeted ads are better at getting our attention than non-targeted ads — but they’re still an unwelcome distraction from whatever it is we’re wanting to read. Most of us have become pretty good at unconsciously ignoring advertising, especially online. (Often I find myself looking hard for a big special report on a website, because it’s presented on the home page in much the same way as an ad might be, and so I ignore it, in much the same way as it’s easy to miss the big letters spelling out continent names on a world map.) Every time there’s an improvement in targeted advertising, it cuts through that wall and annoys us anew before we slowly learn to ignore it over time.

Eventually, advertisers will be able to get much smarter than they are right now, and the ad-serving algorithms will stop being dumb things based on keyword searches, and will start being able to construct a much more well-rounded idea of who we are and what kind of advertising we’re likely to be interested in. At that point, when the ads we see are targeted to us based on much more than the content of our emails or the goods that we shop for online, they probably won’t feel nearly as creepy or intrusive as they do now. But for the time being, a lot of people are going to continue to get freaked out by these ads, and are going to think that the answer is greater “online privacy”. When I’m not really convinced that’s the problem at all.

Read more at blogs.reuters.com

 

Google Product Search launched in Australia

Google Product Search launched in Australia

Google secretly launched their shopping comparison site here in Australia: http://www.google.com.au/prdhp
http://google-au.blogspot.com/2011/05/google-shopping-arrives-in-australia.html

Merchant Center, advertisers need to list their products: http://www.google.com.au/merchants/default

Getting Started: http://www.google.com/support/merchants/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=188493

Be interesting to see how this goes down under.

Online TV: Good press 4 @DownstreamTweet

Online TV: Good press 4 @DownstreamTweet

Amplify’d from www.smh.com.au
Online TV ads to be traded in auction-style exchanges

ADVERTISERS will be able to bid for television-style ads online across multiple websites by the end of the year, though it could be up to three years before the market represents a large chunk of the $2.2 billion online ad market.

Downstream Marketing and the media-buying consortium Group M say the technology for trading ads placed before, during or after online videos will be in place by December.

Already a small but growing volume of online display ads are bought and sold through exchanges or demand side-platforms run by media-buying groups, or by larger networks such as Google.

Television commercials viewed online is the next sector to become biddable – that is, when ads can be sold in automated, split-second, auction-style trades.

Media executives might be fearful, the media investor Daniel Petre says, but they will have to get used to it.

”As soon as the technology is there advertising will be wrapped in it,” Downstream’s chief executive, Steve Knowles, says.

”More and more people are demanding content online so whether it’s Apple TV, Google, Netflix, the television networks or Facebook that provides it doesn’t really matter. There will be advertising and it will be biddable.”

Rather than sell such ads on a traditional cost per thousand (CPM) model, agencies such as Downstream say they can draw on data such as the websites people visit, the forms they fill in and possibly even their purchasing history online to target specific audience niches with clients’ TVCs. Media agencies can specify a target audience and the maximum price they are prepared to pay for those eyeballs.

“It’s bringing rational pricing to [online] TV,” said Downstream’s chief operating officer, Justin Hind.

Although watching TV shows or films online makes up less than 5 per cent of total viewing, it is predicted to grow rapidly as more TVs are connected to a high-speed internet.

Online video advertising is currently a $33 million market – a relative minnow – but which Frost & Sullivan predict will be worth $180 million by 2015.

Danny Bass, the chief digital officer for the media buying consortium Group M, will sell video ads this way through its demand side platform by the year’s end. But he could not predict what volumes might be traded. “The more inventory that becomes available the more likely it is fall to an exchange.”

Downstream backer Mr Petre, the chairman of Netus, an investment company backed by News Ltd, said an auction-style trading platform did not necessarily mean rates would fall.

“There is a fear that everything that goes through an exchange will go to 50¢ a CPM but if you are delivering valuable content then that won’t be the case,” said Mr Petre, who also sits on the board of Nine Entertainment Co, which has a half-share in Ninemsn.

“People will resist it because they are fearful but in the end advertisers will love it because at last they will pay for advertising that performs well. At last the most appropriate ad is shown to the most appropriate audience.”

Read more at www.smh.com.au

 

Facebook ad formats getting more social

Facebook ad formats getting more social

(via www.clickz.com)

Facebook has launched “Sponsored Stories” ads, which let marketers utilize messages from their “likes” community for paid promotions on the site. The ads contain word-for-word Facebook user posts, while appearing in the right-hand column with other paid promotions on the website.

A bevy of launch partners have already readied campaigns involving the new ads. They include Coca Cola, Levi’s, and Anheuser Busch, as well as nonprofits like Amnesty International, UNICEF, Autism Speaks, and Women for Women.

Jim Squires, marketing products manager for the Palo Alto, CA-based social giant, told ClickZ that Sponsored Stories will be available on the site’s self-service platform in a comparable manner to other ads. They will be purchased on an impression- or per-click basis, he said.

For a brand like Starbucks, an endorsement that looks like this:

starbucks-sponsored1

May appear in an ad unit like this:

starbucks-sponsored

“Essentially, the recommended approach is to use [them] in conjunction with a campaign you are already running,” Squires said. “So, you say, ‘I want to add Sponsored Stories to this.’ In that case, when a Sponsored Story is able to show, it is showing [instead of] the controlled advertiser message.”

Read more at www.clickz.com

Google Instant: Potential Implications for the Advertiser

Google Instant: Potential Implications for the Advertiser

Wow, this is going to be a real game changer, could position 4 become more popular than 1?

Amplify’d from blog.efrontier.com
Google just unveiled Google Instant, where the search engine adjusts results in real time as the user types in the query. Google claims that Instant Search leads to 2-5 seconds of time savings per query. This is the logical extension to Google’s auto
1)  More control to Google:
2)    More impressions reported:
3)    Traffic Shifts:
4)    Quality Score implications:
5)    The Brand Bias:
6)    Your Brand Name Matters:
7)    For SEO
In the coming weeks, I expect to see higher impression volumes on branded terms and traffic pattern shifts among unbranded ones. Google will also have to adjust its Quality Score formula to account for the impression shifts among keywords, specially branded ones to enable advertisers maintain their ROI. As with any significant change, there will be winners and losers. However, who wins and loses remains to be seen.Read more at blog.efrontier.com